dubstep remix
Skip to Content

Magnet Theater Blog: News and Ideas about Comedy, Improv Shows & Classes in NYC

Posts Tagged ‘alex marino’

Wednesday December 10, 2014, 6:00am - by Magnet Theater

large_brianfrange_podcast magnetituneslogo-PODCASTmedium

Host Alex Marino sits down with stand-up, improviser, writer, and podcaster Brian Frange to talk about all things comedy. Brian brags about being the best actor in his high school but admits that becoming a stand-up ruined his chops. He discusses his feat of doing 70 open mics in 30 days and his appearance at this year’s Montreal’s Just For Laughs Festival. Plus, Brian talks about founding Awkward Silence Comedy at Indiana University, how to find your comedic voice, getting started in stand-up and The Unbelievable Podcast, which he hosts. Frazzled Frange might even make an appearance!

Subscribe to the Magnet Theater Podcast via iTunes here.

Enjoy Episode #24 on iTunes or below via SoundCloud.

Friday November 21, 2014, 11:45am - by Magnet Theater

21_emilyshapiro magnetituneslogo-PODCASTmedium

On this episode of the Magnet Podcast, host Alex Marino chats it up with improviser and yogi Emily Shapiro about teaching yoga and doing improv in Costa Rica, Emily’s affection for Lord of the Rings, and people who look like Smeagol.

 

Subscribe to the Magnet Theater Podcast via iTunes here.

Enjoy Episode #21 on iTunes or below via SoundCloud.

Tuesday September 16, 2014, 9:49pm - by Magnet Theater

tj-and-dave

TJ Jagodowski and Dave Pasquesi have a completely deserved reputation as a supernaturally skilled duo.  They also deserve their reputations as gentlemen, thoughtful artists, kind improvisers and generous souls.  And you could not have two bigger fans than Louis Kornfeld and Alex Marino, the co-hosts of this episode.  TJ and Dave expound on their work, both improv and sketch, plans for their new theater in Chicago, and their thoughts behind directing, acting, teaching and being one half of something special. They also don’t talk about the book they are writing which will be out next year.  Enjoy.

Subscribe to the Magnet Theater Podcast via iTunes here.

Subscribe with iTunes

Enjoy Episode #16 on iTunes or below via SoundCloud.

Tuesday September 2, 2014, 11:54pm - by Magnet Theater

razowsky_herbstman_hamilton magnetituneslogo-PODCASTsmall

It’s our pleasure to share this intense and hilarious archive conversation with Dave Razowsky and Ed Herbstman recorded live at Magnet Theater. Alex Marino asks the right questions and doesn’t get any of the answers he wanted.  Neither does the audience when it’s opened up to questions at the end.  A fun listen to be sure. Ed particularly seems to be enjoying himself, perhaps because Razowsky was his first improv teacher back in 1990 when he was in high school.

Catch master teacher Dave Razowsky next time he’s in NYC teaching at Magnet, and be sure to see Razowsky, Herbstman and Hamilton, which is really really good.  Rachel Hamilton is the woman in the photo.  She’s really really good.

 

 

Subscribe to the Magnet Theater Podcast via iTunes here.

Enjoy Episode #14 on iTunes or below via SoundCloud.

Monday August 11, 2014, 4:34pm - by Magnet Theater

Comedian Adam Wade photographed the GoldHawk club, Hoboken, NJ. magnetituneslogo-PODCASTmedium

18-time Moth StorySlam Champion (2-time GrandSlam Champion) and Magnet instructor, Adam Wade, as interviewed by Alex Marino. Adam Wade is an actor and storyteller based in NYC. He was recently seen on Comedy Central’s ‘Inside Amy Schumer’. Adam has been featured on The Moth Podcast numerous times and has performed at renowned NYC shows such as The Moths Main Stage, The Nights of Our Lives, The Rejection Show, The Liar Show, Mortified, Stripped Stories, Speakeasy Stories, and True Tales From College (which he is the co-producer and co-host of). He has appeared on the NFL NETWORKs Top 10 Football Follies, ESPNs Mayne Street and ESPN CLASSICs Classic Now where he interviewed such legends as Mike Ditka and Reverend Run from RUN DMC. He was a featured performer on Comedy Central’s Tough Crowd with Colin Quinn and NBCs Late Night with Conan OBrien. He has written for NY Times, NY Press, Glamour Magazine, ESPN The Magazine and Hoboken Reporter.

Subscribe to the Magnet Theater Podcast via iTunes here.

Enjoy Episode #12 on iTunes or below via SoundCloud.

Monday July 14, 2014, 3:45pm - by Magnet Theater

Reductress_Beth_SarahPodcast magnetituneslogo-PODCASTmediumReductress fans will love this interview of Beth Newell and Sarah Pappalardo, the news satire site’s co-founders.

Reductress.com is the first and only fake women’s news magazine. They parody the entertainment, advertising, and other media sources that women consume daily. Forbes named it one of the top 100 websites for women last year.  And it’s super funny.

The Magnet Blog interviewed them back in January – Check out out :

REPORT: Women Officially As Funny As Men, Still Bitches

Now you can listen as Magnet’s Alex Marino interviews these smart and funny writers on the nuts and bolts of creating a comedy platform, their process, how you can submit your writing, and where they are headed.  This episode was recorded earlier this year at Magnet Training Center.

Enjoy Episode #8 on iTunes or below via SoundCloud.

Subscribe to the Magnet Theater Podcast via iTunes here.

Learn more about Beth and Sarah after the jump!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sq3KKBRpjYU

more

Monday April 21, 2014, 8:11am - by Magnet Theater

Magnet Theater is excited to announce The Magnet Podcast! In Episode 1: Host Louis Kornfeld interviews Magnet Theater founders Ed Herbstman, Alex Marino and Armando Diaz about their past, present and future.  They chat about their Chicago beginnings, the creation of The Armando Diaz Experience and the process of starting The Magnet Theater.  Ed tries to explain why he became a cop while Armando makes fun of him.  Don’t miss it.

Huge thanks to our wonderfully talented podcast engineer, Grant Goldberg.

Wednesday November 13, 2013, 11:47am - by WillyAppelman

large_thewake

During November, Alex Marino directs the latest installment of The Director’s Series, The Wake. Every Thursday night at 9pm, The Wake takes you on an adventure inspired by an obituary. I interviewed Alex via email to discuss The Wake and his inspiration behind the form.

What is The Wake and why did you choose this form?
The wake is a form I started thinking about when i was taking classes in LA. I was feeling kinda frustrated because we had been working on the invocation, which I found really interesting, but a lot of my classmates were really dismissive–they’d roll their eyes if they didn’t think the suggestion was cool, they seemed a little bit mocking of improv itself. It was LA and they were just too cool for it. So I started trying to think of a way to approach the invocation that would force performers to at least have a little bit of respect for the suggestion… and I figured “what if you had to do an invocation of a person who had just died… in a room full of people who loved them.” So it kinda stayed in my head gestating for a while. Then when Magnet first opened I was approached by a practice group, it was one of the first groups I’d coached in New York, and that was Louis Kornfeld, Megan Gray, Charlie Whitcroft, Jon Bander, Corey Grimes, and Kelly Buttermore. And after working with them for a little bit I asked if they’d like to experiment with this form I’d been thinking about and they were totally game. What we arrived at was a modified invocation of someone in that day’s obituaries, inviting them to come into the theater and share their story before they go. I heard, and this may be apocryphal, that the practice of holding wakes came from a period in Ireland where they disinterred a lot of old graves and found scratch marks on the inside of the coffins. They realized that something like 1 in 10 people were being buried alive. So they decided to leave the dead out in for a period of time after they passed to give them one last chance to wake up. So the Wake seemed fitting as a name for the form. I kinda liked the notion that this show is one last chance for the dead to come back.

I chose it for this Director’s Series because it had been a while since I’d seen it done and I wanted to work with the original cast again. A couple years ago I taught a class in The Wake, and those bozos have been asking me when they were gonna get to do it again, so I thought I’d invite them along too.

What do you find funny?
All kinds of stuff. Smart stuff, dumb stuff. Deep stuff, light stuff. Lots of things are funny. To me, the funniest thing to think about is that we’re all just a huge biological accident that learned how to wear clothes and comb its hair. That shit is hilarious to me. We’re a mostly bald, mostly flimsy, slow moving animal, with small, dull teeth and worthless claws. We can barely climb, we can’t fly, or hold our breath very long. We have bad backs and lethal allergies to peanuts and shellfish–but not all of us, so you don’t even know if someone is allergic until they just almost die. We eat and drink through the same hole we use to breathe and speak, and somehow we’ve survived long enough to figure out space travel, novelty t-shirts, iPhones and art that goes on your fingernails. It’s incredibly funny to me just how we spend our time.

Do you find death funny?
Death is not funny, no, but everything around death is funnier because of it. Death is the ultimate straight man. I think to have laughter there needs to be a break in tension, which means there needs to be tension to begin with. The more the tension and the bigger the break, the more satisfying the laugh. The uneasiness people feel when they’re faced with death is a great primer for laughter, and that kind of laughter makes it easier to live with death.

What is the future of improv?
I dunno. At some point enough people are going to complain loudly and correctly enough about not getting properly recognized and compensated for content they improvise for commercials and movies… so probably a union will come out of that. And you’ll see “additional content improvised by” in the credits of films which will be good, but things will be weird… or maybe they wont. Maybe the improviser union will be chill. Eventually there will be an improvised show that is so undeniably good that it will get a run on Broadway. Eventually there will be an improvised show that wins a Tony. Some people will be upset by that… or maybe they wont. Maybe Broadway will have relaxed a bit by then. Someone is going to bring a true and honest, disinterested study of improvisation with all its techniques, history, and various applications to the university level, build a curriculum around it, and just like performance studies and jazz you’ll be able to get a college degree in improvisation. I would like to think that degree in improv would be worth more than getting a degree in performance studies or jazz, but it probably won’t be… and after four years, it definitely won’t make anyone a better improviser than performing in every black box and bar that will let you… but, no matter how much actual experience you may have in the field, you’ll need to have a degree in improv to be able to teach improv at the university level… So that will be a nice little scam.

The Wake plays every Thursday in November at 9pm. Make Reservations Here!

Thursday December 27, 2012, 3:29pm - by WillyAppelman


The Evente is not the easiest form out there, in fact it can be quite difficult to understand at times.  It begins with one central event, suggested by the audience, and builds from there.  The forms utilizes flashbacks and time jumps, all while focusing on relationships surrounding the event. Created by Armando Diaz in the late 90’s, it is part of the “wild wild west improv movement” that Diaz created when he started the Magnet in 2005.

Check out the above chart  that will help you understand Evente better!  And if you’re looking to study the form with Alex Marino, the next session starts February 2nd!  More info!

Wednesday May 2, 2012, 11:22am - by WillyAppelman

In the latest installment of The Director’s Series, Christina Gausas takes the reins on The Subject.  The Subject is a form that  “follows the central character of the evening (the subject), never leaving the stage while the others enter and exit as various friends, relatives, demons and fantasy figures”.

The Subject, created by Alex Fendrich, was originally performed at the iO theater in Chicago and was “Highly Recommended” by The Chicago Sun-Times.  Gausas was a member of the original cast and now she leads an all-star cast made up of Louis Kornfeld, Megan Gray, Alex Marino, Angela Demanti, Sebastian Connelli, Ruby Marez, Binu Paulose, Tom Levin, and Liz McDonnell.

The Subject opens Thursday May 3rd at 10pm, and is followed by an Opening Night Party at Mustang Sally’s (28th & 7th).  Come to the show and celebrate afterwards with great food and drink specials!

The Subject, opening May 3rd at 10pm at The Magnet Theater!

12