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Magnet Theater Blog: News and Ideas about Comedy, Improv Shows & Classes in NYC

Posts Tagged ‘new york’

Friday November 21, 2014, 11:45am - by Magnet Theater

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On this episode of the Magnet Podcast, host Alex Marino chats it up with improviser and yogi Emily Shapiro about teaching yoga and doing improv in Costa Rica, Emily’s affection for Lord of the Rings, and people who look like Smeagol.

 

Subscribe to the Magnet Theater Podcast via iTunes here.

Enjoy Episode #21 on iTunes or below via SoundCloud.

Tuesday April 22, 2014, 11:17am - by Magnet Theater
The Second City

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The Magnet Theater will be holding a Q&A session with Second City Casting Director Beth Kligerman, Wednesday April 23rd from 5:30pm-6:30pm at The Magnet Theater Training Center (259 w. 30th street).  This will be an hour long information session about auditioning for the Second City Cruise Ships.  If you have any questions, please contact Magnet Artistic Director Megan Gray (megan (at)magnettheater(dot)com).

Monday April 21, 2014, 8:11am - by Magnet Theater

Magnet Theater is excited to announce The Magnet Podcast! In Episode 1: Host Louis Kornfeld interviews Magnet Theater founders Ed Herbstman, Alex Marino and Armando Diaz about their past, present and future.  They chat about their Chicago beginnings, the creation of The Armando Diaz Experience and the process of starting The Magnet Theater.  Ed tries to explain why he became a cop while Armando makes fun of him.  Don’t miss it.

Huge thanks to our wonderfully talented podcast engineer, Grant Goldberg.

Monday April 7, 2014, 11:23am - by Magnet Theater

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Second City Theatricals is seeking actors for ensembles on Norwegian Cruise Line ships.

A ship specific audition will be held at the Magnet Training Center in New York City on Thursday, April 24, 2014.  Auditions will be completely improvised. Performers should be a graduate of a conservatory-level program (such as: Peoples Improv Theater, Upright Citizens Brigade, or Magnet).
Interested actor/improvisers should email a head shot and resume to: auditions@secondcity.com ON Monday, April 14/Tuesday, April 15.   Please include  ‘Second City Theatricals – NYC – April 24′  in the subject line of the email. Performers not following these guidelines may not be considered for a an audition time.  Slots will be filled in order of receipt.
Call backs will be held Friday, April 25 – TBD exact time.  Second City Theatricals ensemble members – work for 4 months at a time at sea.  There will be a ship specific Q&A held on Wednesday, April 23 at Magnet (more details to come).
The Second City was founded in 1959 as a hub for sketch and improvisational comedy., and has held a contract with Norwegian Cruise Line since 2005
Saturday March 15, 2014, 10:08am - by Magnet Theater

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We’re excited to announce our 2014 Spring Circuit Teams! These teams will debut Friday, March 28th, with shows continuing for 10 weeks until May 30. All shows free, at the Training Center, and at 10:30.

Team Niles
Sarah Wolff
Andrew Joelson
Anne Antonucci
Jeffrey Danneman
Lee Rosenberg
Shalini Tripathi
John de Guzman
Tara Getter
Coach: Amanda Xeller

CLICK MORE FOR THE REST OF THE TEAM INFO…

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Tuesday March 4, 2014, 8:03am - by Magnet Theater

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Auditions for Musical Megawatt teams will be held on Saturday, March 29th. To audition, you must have completed Musical Improv Level 3 at the Magnet. To schedule an audition, fill out THIS FORM no later than Monday, March 17th. You will receive your official audition time on Thursday, March 20th. We look forward to seeing you there!

Click Here to Apply

Tuesday February 25, 2014, 10:42am - by Magnet Theater

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We’re very excited to announce the Spring 2014 round of The Circuit, which will begin Friday, March 28th, 2014!

Applications for Circuit teams will open Monday, March 3. The deadline to apply is Monday, March 10, at noon.

Applicants will be chosen by lottery. If chosen, you will be placed on a team of 8 improvisers and assigned a coach. You will rehearse with your coach and team once a week, with rotating performances on Friday nights at 10:30PM at the Magnet Studio Theater.

If you have completed Level 3 of Magnet’s Training Program and are not part of a Magnet house improv team, you are eligible to apply.

The Circuit is a great way to gain experience in being in an improv ensemble. We highly encourage those who are eligilble to apply.

If you have any questions or comments, please email us at circuit [at] magnettheater [dot] com.

Sunday February 16, 2014, 10:47am - by Amanda Ariel Peggy Xeller

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The Magnet Theater not only boasts its current roster of powerful improvisers, writers, and performers, but also celebrates those who have taken on new adventures in their lives and with their comedy.

Matt Koff, a writer for the Daily Show and stand-up, started off here at the Magnet and is now taking NYC by storm. We wanted to catch up with Matt and shine the Magnet Theater Blog Spotlight on him and his journey in comedy. I (Amanda Ariel Peggy Xeller!) conducted an email interview with Matt. Below are his responses:

 

Where are you from originally?

Ardsley NY. It’s 45 minutes north of the city

 

When did you realize you wanted to get involved in comedy?

In my senior year of college. I had majored in English so going into comedy seemed like a similarly practical pursuit.

But I had been obsessed with comedy since I was a kid. In middle school I didn’t listen to music. I listened to Monty Python casette tapes.

 

What is your improv and comedy history?

HOO BOY.

I started doing sketch and improv in college at SUNY New Paltz.

Then around 2004 I moved to the city and got involved with a theater collective known as Juvie Hall. There I got involved writing for a weekly show called Saturday Night Rewritten. I met a lot of very talented people, little did I know, I’d be working with later in my career, including my current Daily Show officemate Dan McCoy and my current boss Elliott Kalan.

Armando Diaz was teaching classes at Juvie Hall. I started studying sketch and improv under him, and continued doing so when the Magnet Theater opened. I was on a few Magnet House teams while also working with an indie sketch group known as Mr. Whitepants.

Along the way there were a few small successes that indicated to me that what I was doing wasn’t a total mistake. I was hired to be a regular contributor for the Onion’s video site, a webseries that I worked on with Dan McCoy, 9 AM Meeting, was popular at Channel 101 NY screenings, and actually got us a development deal with MTV. Then Dan got hired to write for the Daily Show and had to abandon the MTV project. The development deal withered because the truth is I’d been riding Dan’s coattails during this process.

Around 2010 I stopped doing improv and sketch and decided to pursue stand-up comedy. The thing I like most about it, as opposed to improv and sketch, is that you don’t need to book rehearsal space or corral fellow team members. It’s a lot less administrative and you get to figure out how funny “you” are in your own voice, without the variables of being onstage with other people or hiding behind characters. Although, I’ve recently come back to improv and sketch and I like it a lot more now that I’ve sort of found my “groove” with stand-up.

 

What initially attracted you to the Magnet?

Armando Diaz. He is a great teacher!

 

Would you recommend that people interested in comedy start with improv? Why/why not? (if not where should they start in your opinion).

Yes. It’s great training. It teaches you how to be in the moment, which is huge for any kind of comedic performing. And it also teaches you how to think and build of ideas (if this, then what) which is huge for any kind of comedic writing. Also for networking reasons. Doing improv is a great way to bond with total strangers immediately.

But in general, I would say try every form of comedy, especially when you’re first starting out. You may be surprised at what you’re good at. I came to the city to be in a sketch group, and 10 years later I do stand-up on most nights of the week.

 

How would you describe the feel of your comedy and stand-up? What’s your style?

That’s a hard thing to say from my perspective. I guess “dry”, “Weird” maybe? Then again I know a lot of people who are a lot drier and weirder than I am. I guess you could say I tell one-liners, but that’s not intentional. I’m just bad at writing long jokes. I guess what I’m trying to say is, “don’t try and put me in a box, man.”

 

How much does audience factor into your performance? Is there a specific group of people you are playing to?

Well, for stand-up, the audience factors in a lot. If people don’t laugh at a joke, I probably won’t tell it, or at least until I work on it some more. Then again, not every audience will laugh at every joke. If a joke gets laughs more times than not, I consider it: “a joke that works.” The only group I’m playing to is “people who might find me funny.” Certain audiences you just know you’re not going to connect with as soon as you hit the stage, and you know what: THAT’S OKAY.

 

What tools do you use when creating work be it in stand-up or writing?

I tend to use a tiny notebook, a big notebook, a pen, a sausage a craisin, and Evernote. I will also workshop potential stand-up jokes on Twitter.

 

Can you talk about some of the projects you have taken on since improvising and performing here?

I co-wrote and co-voiced a webseries called “9 AM Meeting” with Dan McCoy, as mentioned before. I started a fake online campaign to raise money to buy a roomba. Last year I did a sketch show called The Matt Koff Show, which is the first sketch show I’ve ever written by myself.

 

How did you get involved with writing for Jon Stewart?

Well my old comedy buddy Dan recommended I submit a packet. So then I did. The show liked that packet, so then I submitted another packet. Then they told me no and almost a year later they were like “OK fine you can write for us.”

 

Any parting advice?

If you want to do comedy, do it. If you want to write, write. If you want to perform, perform. Do it constantly. Make it your life. Don’t compare yourself to others. Delete your Facebook account. Don’t actually delete your Facebook account though, it’s a good networking tool. And most importantly, HAVE FUN.

 

 

Thursday February 13, 2014, 12:09pm - by Amanda Ariel Peggy Xeller

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Mail’s here! Kevin Cobbs (The Music Industry, Listen, Kid!), who is performing full time on one of the Second City Cruise Ships, just sent a letter to us here at the Magnet to give us a glimpse of his travels. Check it out! And check out that picture of Kevin in San Juan! Wowie-wow-wow-wow!

Ahoy Magneteers,

Greetings and salutations from the Norwegian Gem.  As I write this I’m about halfway through my four month contract with the Second City, and so far its been an absolutely wonderful experience.

Here on the Gem we typically perform one sketch show, two improv shows and one murder mystery luncheon show per nine day cruise. All of which we rehearsed extensively during our week of training in Chicago.  I’d never been to the Second City before and it definitely felt like hallowed ground for a sketch and improv performer like myself.  It was humbling to get up on their different stages to rehearse.  And as a cool bonus experience, our director let us perform in an improv set with the regular cast on their ETC stage.

My cast here on the Gem comes from LA, Toronto and Chicago and they’re all hysterical improvisers and good people.  We hang out together quite a bit and we’ve also become good friends with some of the crew and some of the other entertainers on board.

When we’re not performing, we have a lot of free time to work on our own projects. So I’ve been writing quite a few pee pee jokes and even some poo poo jokes.

In addition to writing, I’ve used my down time to finally fulfill my main duty as a liberal white person by watching the Wire (it really is great so far). I’ve also used my free time to work out every day in the ship’s gym. I’m totally ripped now and I plan on fighting all of you at the Magnet when I return. One by one. Starting with the weakest (Branson Reese) and then working my way up to the strongest.

Its a blast performing our sketch show to a crowd of 1,100 people each week.  Our improv shows are in a smaller space but equally fun and they’re all short form.  I was originally trained in short form so it feels a bit like returning to my improv roots, which is nice.

Passengers are very complimentary when they see us around the ship.  And we get to visit some beautiful ports: San Juan, Puerto Rico, St. Maarten, St. Thomas, and Samana, Dominican Republic.  Living on the boat is like living in a floating bubble where all of us performers are pseudo celebrities.  Then when each cruise ends, everything resets and we’re nobodies again for the first couple of days before our first show.

Though I’m enjoying my time at sea, I look forward to coming home to New York and seeing all y’all Magnet people.  Stay warm and I’ll see you in the spring!

Best,
Kevin Cobbs

Friday January 17, 2014, 11:35am - by Amanda Ariel Peggy Xeller

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The Magnet Theater not only boasts its current roster of powerful improvisers, writers, and performers, but also celebrates those who have taken on new adventures in their lives and with their comedy.

Charlotte Rabbe, a phenomenal Magnet improviser, previously on The Wrath, is now out in L.A. We wanted to catch up with Charlotte and shine the Magnet Theater Blog Spotlight on her and her journey in comedy. We conducted an email interview with Charlotte. Below are her responses:

 

What’s your home town?

CR: Where I grew up? Most of my family is living in NYC now so I consider that my hometown.

 

What is your comedy history (highlighting improv and sketch especially)? What got you interested and when were you first exposed to improv?

CR: I would watch a lot of stand up/sketch shows growing up (The State, The Upright Citizens Brigade TV show, SNL) and I was obsessed… When I started coming into the city after high school I went to a lot of stand up shows but was too afraid to ever do it. I ended up taking an improv class after college even though I had seen very little and got hooked.

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